suemypsychologist

Archive for the ‘730 evaluation’ Category

California county supervisor acknowledges that children’s best interests not always served in family court; event for parents 10/10/10

In 730 evaluation, Divorce and custody on September 29, 2010 at 1:19 pm

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
Gail Steele
Supervisor, Second District

Contact: Supervisor Gail Steele
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
510.272.6692
gail.steele@acgov.org

RENOWNED SAND SCULPTORS WILL CREATE LARGE SAND RIBBON TO PROMOTE AWARENESS THAT “THE BEST INTEREST OF THE CHILD” ARE NOT BEING ACHIEVED IN FAMILY COURT

[Public encouraged to sign THE RIBBON, and share own stories]

Alameda, CA, September 17, 2010 — Archisand Professional Sand Sculptors, a premier team of artists pursuing this craft, will create a significant sand sculpture ribbon for the newly-formed organization “Best Interest of the Child in Custody Cases (BICCC).” Individuals and families who have suffered injustices in Family Court are encouraged to attend the event. There they can sign the ribbon, share their stories, and join a support network to help reform the Family Court system. This event will be held on Sunday, October 10, 2010 in the City of Alameda.

Alameda County Supervisor Gail Steele, a member of the BICCC, states, “In so many instances the decision of the Family Court is not in the best interest of the child.  This is not just a problem in Alameda County, but across the country as well.” In fact the State of California has approved auditing the Family Courts of Marin and Sacramento. Marin County, however, destroyed its Family Courts records, which are now unavailable for audit by the State of California.

Archisand Professional Sand Sculptors is designing a spectacular sand sculpture to call attention to this issue that affects so many children today.  Divorce can take a significant toll on a child. The impact on children as a result of the current state of the Family Court system is often regrettable, and can be tragic.  In the United States every year, many children die as a result of unresolved family custody cases. This event will give the public a first-hand understanding of the magnitude of bad decisions that are occurring in child custody cases today.

Archisand is the only Masters Level sand sculptor group that allows children to participate in team competition. Teaching, learning, and passing the craft on to future generations are at the heart of Archisand’s philosophies. The Team has won the US Open Sandcastle competition event seven out of the last eleven years.  To learn more about Archisand’s work, including images from the 2009 Long Beach Marathon event, please visit http://socalsandcastles.com.

The event will be held at Crown Memorial State Beach, in the City of Alameda, Alameda County, California, on Sunday October 10, 2010 from 11:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Parking will be free in the State Beach parking lot, on 8th Street at the end of Otis.  Please contact Alison Urdan at 510 789-0510 or Gail Steele at 510-272-6692 for more information.

__________________________________________________________________________________

1221 Oak Street, Suite 536    Oakland, California 94612    Telephone (510) 272-6692  Fax (510) 271-5115

HAYWARD DISTRICT OFFICE    Telephone (510) 670-6277

www.acgov.org ●          Gail.Steele@acgov.org

Advertisements

California custody evaluator Roy W. Bradbury admitted under oath that he was unqualified to serve in the courts

In 730 evaluation, Divorce and custody, psychologist on August 13, 2010 at 1:38 pm

The man who did psychological evaluations of children involved in divorce cases in San Bernardino, Los Angeles and Orange counties, guiding the courts in determining custody, and whose recommendations controlled the fate of thousands of individuals for over a decade took his own life earlier this year.

The death of Dr. Roy W. Bradbury, who was a court appointed expert for so-called 730 evaluations, has thrown into question the validity of the determinations that were made in hundreds of divorce cases in San Bernardino County.

Bradbury worked with lawyers, known as minor counsels, who were appointed by the court to represent children caught in the middle of the divorce of their parents.

Bradbury admitted under oath that he had lacked the proper licensing updates with regard to domestic violence since 2003.

Those minor counsels would recommend interviews with and reports on the children, known as 730 evaluations, to determine the child’s state of mind, preference toward one parent or the other and to make an evaluation as to which parent should get primary custody of the child.

For his work, Bradbury was paid $120 per hour, or in the neighborhood of $10,000 to $15,000 for each 730 evaluation he delivered.

In virtually all cases in which Bradbury was brought in as an expert witness, the court made a custody decision in accordance with his recommendations.

Bradbury was deemed so credible, that judges routinely overlooked contradictory opinions rendered by other psychologists or evaluators brought in on the same cases.

For years, however, critics have alleged that Bradbury was capricious, arbitrary or biased in his findings and that he in fact lacked the requisite training and licensing to function in the role of an expert psychological  witness.

Within the last 12 months, evidence to undergird those accusations emerged. In September 2009, according to court records, Bradbury admitted under oath that he had lacked the proper licensing updates with regard to domestic violence since 2003.  Such a lack of credentials rendered him unqualified under the family law code to serve as an evaluator.

Despite Bradbury’s possession of a PhD. in psychology from USC, he was unable to pass the state of California’s licensing exam as a psychologist.

Earlier this year, as information about his lack of training and his fraudulent licensing spread, rumors were rife that Bradbury was on the verge of departing the United States and seeking some form of refuge in Costa Rica.

A little more than two months ago, he died by his own hand. His action in taking his own life brings into question his own mental stability, and by extension, the validity of the thousands of conclusions he provided about the mental state of others.

On Saturday May 29, according to the Los Angeles Coroner’s Office, Bradbury who resided in Walnut, drove to an industrial park in the city of Industry. There, at 21508 Ferrero Parkway, a spot secluded by railroad tracks and relatively isolated and remote buildings, Bradbury shot himself while in his vehicle.

According to the coroner’s office, Bradbury expired from a single gunshot wound to the head.

Two years ago, a website, http://courtlawabusers.blogspot.com/2008/11/dr-roy-bradbury.html, was set up for the purpose of chronicling complaints with regard to Bradbury.

Since that time, questions about his level of competency, his bias and his tendency to make findings that were considered damaging to children have mushroomed. That adverse publicity may have played a role in the more recent revelations about his lack of accreditation.

Despite those revelations, San Bernardino County Superior Court has maintained Bradbury on its experts list for psychologists.

In one case, an eight year old girl was removed from the custody of her mother. Subsequently, tapes of Bradbury’s sessions with the girl surfaced in which Bradbury could be heard screaming at the child. One counseling professional who has heard the tapes told the Sentinel the tapes demonstrated Bradbury was mocking a child under stress and was not engaged in a therapeutic relationship with his client.

In the aftermath of his death, dozens of Bradbury’s 730 evaluations are due for consideration in various courts in Southern California. Motions to strike several of those evaluations as evidence are now being prepared.

Source:  “Suicide Claims Bradbury,” San Bernardino County Sentinel, August 6, 2010.